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Aiolis (Aeolis) - Region 7

Cities / Mints

1 - Aigai (Aegae)
2 - Autokane (Autocane, also Cane)
3 - Boione (Boeone)
4 - Elaia (Elaea)
5 - Gryneion (Gryneon, Grynium)
6 - Kyme (Cyme)

7 - Larisa Phrikonis (Phriconis, also Larissa)


 

8 - Myrina
9 - Neonteichos (Neontechus)
10 - Temnos (Temnus)
11 - Tisna

12 - Aiolis Uncertain

Eras
 
Archaic
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Classical
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Hellenistic
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Roman
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Historical

The coastal region of western Anatolia between Smyrna and the bay of Edremit was known as Aiolis. Herodotos counts twelve Aiolian cities to correspond to the cities of Ionia, the most famous of which were: Lesbos, Pitane, Elaea, Gryneion, Myrina, Aigai, Kyme, Neonteichos, Temnos, Larisa and Smyrna. Although Smyrna was founded as an Aiolian settlement, it was later inhabited by the people of Kolophon and absorbed into the Ionian League.

Aiolia has been inhabited since Paleolithic times and flourished in the Bronze age under Phrygian rule. Lesbos seems to have been its most important centre. During the 7th century BC there was an immigration from Mytilene and especially from Methymna to the opposite shores of the Aegean. As the areas primary concern was agriculture it did not play a large role in historical developments, however it was extremely important in the fields of music and poetry. Sappho, Alkaios and Terpander, the inventoir of the 7-tone scale were all from Lesbos.

Aiolis was conquered by Kroisos (Croesus), king of Lydia (560-546 BC), and later held successively by the Persians, Makedonians, Seleukids, and Pergamenes. Attalos III, the last king of Pergamon, bequeathed Aiolis to Rome in 133 BC. Shortly afterward, it was made part of the Roman province of Asia. At the partition of the Roman Empire (395 AD), Aiolis was assigned to the East Roman (Byzantine) empire and remained under Byzantine rule until the early 15th century, when the Ottoman Turks occupied the area.

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